Embrace summer: DB HZ panoramas and NB VRTCL panoramas. NOW 2018

Leaving Seward via Resurrection BayHubbard GlacierLost Artists Features

DAVID BECHTOL.  wall installation panoramas Alaska (above)

EMBRACE summer
DREAM_body-wrap-celestial-blurFLTWBX
NANCY BECHTOL. wall installation vertical pano series: Body Wraps (above)
2630 W. Fletcher
The Lost Artists Colony
Chicago (North Side)*, IL 60647
June 9th – June 9th

Opening: June 9th 5:00 PM – 9:00 PM
one day only. all welcome. free event
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Now::Historic Archives of RSG : Many Chicago Artists/Work

Glimpse Now::Historic Archives of RSG : Many Chicago Artists/Works

  •  Nancy Bechtol

The Randolph Street Gallery Archives features photographs, event calendars, posters, and other materials documenting the nearly twenty-year history (1979-1998) of an important Chicago cooperative, gallery, and performance space. With a particular interest in the social and political issues of its time and a deep commitment to community engagement, Randolph Street Gallery was a critical venue for new forms of artistic expression and left a lasting impact both locally and globally

https://rhizome.org/editorial/2016/nov/17/ Peter Taub. DP: Could you give some background on Randolph Street Gallery? PT: Randolph Street Gallery (RSG) was an artist-run space in Chicago, founded in 1979. I started working there in the mid-80s. It was run by artists, directed by artists, and served artists.

Nancy Bechtol Comments:: This is just a glimpse into the place that, if you ever went there, or showed art there, it is embeded in your very soul. I was so honored several times in my early days to show my work. Controversial works were welcome.. Freedom of Art and Thought and Being There. Artists were engaged and the audience contributed interactively.

There is no saying RSG without the name of the legend\Peter Taub –longtime Director of RSG. Incredibly adapt at blending art, politics, and artists egos to create an art scene — inclusive and amazing –underlined to infinity.

For the curious, art lovers, artists and Chicago history buffs. take a look. it is a real eye opener. I just found out it was online! I flashed back to the infamous video I shot of Hamza that caused quite a stir when it played on CAN TV. honest and forthright, it nailed racial profiling..even in a well known restaurant. And my sound installation which needed walls built, and Peter Taub, assisted by husband, David, carried walls up from the basement, and made a house for the “Reagan Psalms”. “Hamza Speaks” is listed in RSG archive. Also, during the time of the Flag controversy, I displayed “On One Nightstand of and American Artist” a social political piece which also was in a group show by CAC –that gathered works done on and by flags, including Dred Scott’s piece, that was first shown at SAIC to much attention on the subject. ON and on and on..

 

Randolph Street Gallery

Randolph Street Gallery (RSG) was an alternative exhibition space in Chicago, Illinois, from 1979[1] until its closing in 1998 and a vital local force in the development of a variety of new art forms and the contemporary national and international arts milieu. Founded by two artists, Tish Miller and Sarah Schwartz, RSG began in Schwartz’s living room, later moving to 853 W. Randolph Street on Chicago’s west side.[2] The late 1970s, was a period when young artists in all disciplines were collectively founding visual and performing art organizations as alternatives to mainstream and commercial venues in many US cities.[3] RSG was one of more than a dozen ‘alternative’ galleries – along with many new ‘alternative’ theatre groups – situated on the near north and west sides of Chicago. The gallery’s focus was on the needs of artists and practitioners who created work that was unsupported, or at the time, perceived to be unsupportable by most commercial or institutional funders.[4] Randolph Street Gallery was also the locus for groundbreaking collaborative projects such as The File Room: An Archive on Cultural Censorship, conceived by Antoni Muntadas,[5] and was the publisher of P-Form: Performance Art Magazine.[6]

For nineteen productive years RSG fulfilled its role as cultural laboratory for Chicago and the general art world.[7] By the late 1990s, changing trends, expectations, and patterns of patronage in the arts took their toll on the gallery as well as on any of the other few comparable artist-run organizations in the United States (e.g., La Mamelle and the Capp Street Project in San Francisco, the Washington Project for the Arts in the District of Columbia) and the gallery eventually closed.[8]

Many of the emerging and mid-career artists who presented and experimented at Randolph Street Gallery are now recognized as leaders who have changed the context of our cultural dialog. They include visual and performance artists, photographers, filmmakers, sound and video artists, writers and curators.[9]

In 1999, the complete archives of Randolph Street Gallery were donated to the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC) and include all available material documenting the nineteen-year history of RSG, a high percentage of which are original source materials. The archives contain historical records of performance, sculpture, visual and other art forms created or presented by local and international artists, artists’ portfolios, slides, posters, signage, photographs, performance art programs, publications, news clippings, publicity files, a variety of video formats, sound recordings, computer files, administrative records, and some works of art donated to Randolph Street Gallery for auctions and fund raisers.[10] Public access to the archives is possible on a limited basis and by reservation only. The Randolph Street Gallery Archives are complemented by an additional 33 linear feet of archival material from the editors of P-Form: Performance Art Magazine.

References[edit]

1.    Jump up^ Artner, Alan G. “To market…as an alternative” Chicago Tribune (17 Aug 1979: B12)

2.    Jump up^ Obejas, Achy “A Requiem for Chicago’s Incubator of Performance Art” Chicago Tribune (23 Feb 1998: 1)

3.    Jump up^ Warren, L. 1984. Alternative Spaces: A History in Chicago. Chicago. Museum of Contemporary Art.

4.    Jump up^ Obejas, Achy “A Requiem for Chicago’s Incubator of Performance Art” Chicago Tribune (23 Feb 1998: 1)

5.    Jump up^ Artner, Alan G. Muntadas’ Installation Fits Current Thinking” Chicago Tribune (27 May 1994: 64)

6.    Jump up^ P-Form: performance art news http://digital-libraries.saic.edu/cdm/landingpage/collection/pform

7.    Jump up^ Hixson, Kathryn “Randolph Street Gallery” New Art Examiner (Sep 2000: 50-51) v28 n1

8.    Jump up^ Obejas, Achy “Randolph Street Gallery Closes, Victim of Rapidly Declining Funds” Chicago Tribune (14 Feb 1998: 5)

9.    Jump up^ Hixson, Kathryn “Randolph Street Gallery” New Art Examiner (Sep 2000: 50-51) v28 n1

10. Jump up^ Randolph Street Gallery Archives http://libraryguides.saic.edu/rsga

External links[edit]

·        Randolph Street Gallery Archive, School of the Art Institute of Chicago

·        P-Form digital covers and table of contents, School of the Art Institute of Chicago

·        Ellen Rothenberg’s course, The Collaborative Project to preserve, process, and exhibit the Randolph Street Archives

·        The File Room. Initiated as an artist’s project by Antoni Muntadas The File Room was originally produced by Randolph Street Gallery in 1979-1998 with the support of the School of Art and Design and the Electronic Visualization Laboratory at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

·        Two Chicago Galleries and Why They Closed by Victor M. Cassidy

·        Adrian Piper, My Calling (Card) #1 Meta-Performance (1987-88; 00:58:00) – include video file

·        Chicago Alternative ArtSpace Panel, April 2, 2008

·        Alternative ArtSpace Panel Discussion – includes audio and video files

·        Erik and the Animals, July 17, 2005 by Erik Fabian An archive of video documentation of performances at the Randolph Street Gallery from 1987-1996 at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago’s Flaxman Library.

·        Living Cross, Allyson and Alex Gray, Oct. 15, 1983 – Performance

“Skin Suit”: @ARC Gallery. art for a reason. We see through the transparent cover-up. We Believe the Women. In Solidarity. Resist.

SSKINSuitarc women showwebxSkin Suit. a collaborative work by Ron Anon Grenko (RIP), Hermann Harmann, MadPalX ©2017

special limited edition photo/digipainting

will be premiered at ARC Gallery Exhibition, “It Figures, 2017” Nov 2017 Chicago

Sale of this work is donated to Sarah’s Circle Sarah’s Circle is a refuge for women who are homeless or in need of a safe space. By providing life necessities, housing, case management, clinical and social services, we encourage women to empower themselves by rebuilding both emotionally and physically; realizing their unique potential.

https://www.sarahs-circle.org/

SkinSuit, photograph/digipainting, Conceptual, Interactive. 19×27″framed, 2017, $200 or best offer (donation to Sarah’s Circle, serving the needs of women)

Sending a message:SOS.

Do this NOW

Make a List+Make a Fist. We see through the transparent cover-up. We Believe the Women. In Solidarity. Resist.

Fort Sill Apache Woman Director: THIS IS INDIAN LAND. FILM preview! (trailer released)

“THIS IS INDIAN LAND” first peek at the Trailer!

This is an Indie film produced by Shadow Bechtol Studio. Chicago. Sharon Okee-Chee Skolnick, Fort Sill Apache is the Director with a deep vision of telling the story through the eyes of Native People from the American Indian Center.  David Bechtol, Director of Photography/Tech Supervisor and Nancy Bechtol, Cinematographer/Editor/SFX

Clik here:: Trailer for This is Indian Land

thanks for viewing and all the interest in this truly unique film ! your feedback welcome.  More as it comes.. Currently in Postproduction. Do send good vibes our way. Indie is awesome but DIY truly is an eyeopener…yes,  we will prevail for true history.  Release for 2017.

 

“Oppositions”& Resistances: ART and Life= t h e n and N O W:: a photo essay

NOW, PAST and ongoing..

selection of images from decades of resistance and opposition.

Currently in the group show at the Jackson Junge Gallery, Chicago  “Oppositions”

Oppositions Exhibition at Jackson Junge Gallerybehindthesigns_Bechtol_Nancy_FINXSendJY300dpix.jpg

and.. more…decades of social justice: photojournalism and art hybrid.

SWAN for Nancy Bechtol at Lost Artists Colony April 2017

Social Documentary

selections:

cropped-actfreechris_occupy-chicagonotxt_aic.jpg

ChicagoMarch_downtown_Nancy Bechtol-APAp hotojournalist-1-18

Linked in Nancy Bechtol photo Essay

Chris Drew and Supporters Speak: Echoes of Artist vs 1st Class Felony

Free Speech! Rights vs 1st Class Felony

Chris Drew and Supporters Speak: Echoes of Artist vs 1st Class Felony

Drew’s Rights upheld in ruling in court 2012, probono attorney, Joshua Kutnick, defended vs Ill State Attorney Alvarez. Judge Sacks declared, “wholly innocent conduct”

in 2014, March, the Illinois Eavesdropping Law was abolished by the Illinois Supreme Court.

see the legacy footage which was posted during Chris Drew’s Court Case, as he and supporters, on the streets of Chicago speak!

http://youtu.be/PoeMWVwu90U

the lady said an important thing.”knowledge is power” that’s why they want to take your rights away. So you have no power and they can hide truth. FIGHT ON PEOPLE.. – anon-blog comment

This video clip shows Chris Drew and supporters on the streets giving away art from the “Art Patch Project” a community effort from UM-CAC, Uptown Multicultural Arts Center. posted on YouTube, during the court case of Chris Drew. 1.26.2010 TAKIN’ IT TO THE STREETS OF CHICAGO. Downtown Chris Drew and supporters bring the Felony eavesdropping charges to the public. The Channel 2 CBS news, responds with 5pm dynamic and supportive piece on the issues. The broadcast piece includes clips from this videographer’s youtube video on the arrest of Chris Drew.

Chicago Premiere at the Logan Theatre ,” Free Speech and the Transcendent Journey of Chris Drew, Street Artist” by Nancy Bechtol. Featuring indie Music by Behind the Sun-Andy Alton & David Mansfield “Paper Airplane” courtesy of Hey Now Records one night only – 11.14.14 Friday 7:30 PM

See/Hear the Nancy Bechtol interview by Dan O’Donnell – Logan Square TV

http://logansquare.tv/?p=903

An important documentary about street artist Chris Drew, and his felony trial for recording police, will premiere at The Logan Theatre on November 14.

Logan TV-Dan O’Donnell posts exclusive “ART is SPEECH” – on 11.14.14. see the film on DREW

Chicago Premiere at the Logan Theatre ,” Free Speech and the Transcendent Journey of Chris Drew, Street Artist” by Nancy Bechtol. Featuring indie Music by Behind the Sun-Andy Alton & David Mansfield “Paper Airplane” courtesy of Hey Now Records one night only – 11.14.14 Friday 7:30 PM

See/Hear the Nancy Bechtol interview by Dan O’Donnell – Logan Square TV

http://logansquare.tv/?p=903

An important documentary about street artist Chris Drew, and his felony trial for recording police, will premiere at The Logan Theatre on November 14. The film, Free Speech and the Transcendent Journey of Chris Drew, Street Artist is directed by Logan Square resident, Nancy Bechtol. Literally thousands of people across Chicago know Chris Drew, because of his vibrant presence in Chicago’s art community and on Chicago’s streets… In the 2 1/2 years before he passed away in 2012, Drew became known to thousands more across the country and around the world, as he faced up to 15 years in prison for recording police on duty. The video recordings that Nancy Bechtol made on the day of his arrest as well as the years leading up to his arrest became the basis of this documentary. Footage from as early as 2002 shows Drew’s activism and his involvement with the art communities and Critical Mass community in Chicago. Interviews with his attorneys as well as people who knew him through the Uptown Multicultural Art Center are also featured

In December, 2009, he was arrested for selling art for $1 in front of Macy’s on State Street. He wanted to get arrested in order to challenge the city ordinance that would require him to wear a permit in order to sell art. Drew was trying to illustrate that artists are different from merchandise peddlers. Legal precedent has held that art is a form of speech that can’t be curtailed.. Before his arrest, Drew spent months with Bechtol recording his interactions with police on various occasions at various locations across Chicago. He would give away his art, and eventually began to sell it. He asked film maker Nancy Bechtol to record his activities with a video camera. He also carried a small audio recorder…Drew’s plan to challenge the (Chicago Peddler’s Ordinance) took a sharp turn when he was arrested. Officers found the audio recorder in his pocket, and subsequently dropped the peddling charges in favor of charges of eavesdropping

Eavesdropping charges – a Class 1 felony and carry a prison sentence of up to 15 years. Cook County State’s Attorney Anita Alvarez maintained that the conversation with the police was private, even though they were acting as public servants and were on a public way. Drew was exonerated in court in 2012, and Alvarez’s office immediately appealed the ruling. Drew died months later, however, so his case alone would not change the law in Illinois. Findings from his case, however, did affect similar cases that were being tried in Illinois at around the same time. In March of this year, the Illinois Supreme Court finally ruled that citizens have a constitutional right to record police actions in public.

Chris Drew’s Legacy lives on! Now in the Film. see it.

“ART is SPEECH!”

Chris Drew’s Legacy lives on! Now in the Film. see it. The film is scheduled to show for one night only, on Friday, November 14. Tickets are on sale now at The Logan Theatre box office or online at www.thelogantheatre.com

You can check out the trailer below. Much more information about Chris Drew and this film can be found on Nancy Bechtol’s website

“ART is SPEECH!”

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